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Depop drama: Buying, selling and everything you need to know

I first used Depop about four years ago when I was in college and desperate to make a quick buck. I listed a few things for sale but as my phone camera was pretty terrible, my pics weren’t very enticing and I never made a sale.

I soom deleted the app and didn’t feel very encouraged to use it again.

Fast forward to 2020, Depop is even bigger than ever. During lockdown I began obsessing about tracking down a pair of shoes after I lost one while moving house. I’m wearing them in the pic below.

After searching the shoe online, several Depop links came up. I downloaded the app again and began trawling.

I messaged several people to no avail but finally I found a girl selling them in a size 5 and bought them from her. Unfortunately, they didn’t fit.

The shoes soon went to the charity shop but my curiousity was piqued and I realised Depop was the perfect way to hunt items that I’d previously seen in shops/online or no longer fitted me.

I tracked down the shoes but sadly they were too small.

This behaviour may seem bizarre to people with real hobbies but for me, it’s proved very satisfying.

A friend of mine even found shoes for her wedding on there. She was finding it hard to shop because of lockdown, I asked her what style and size she was after and within a few minutes, I’d pulled up some options on Depop!

So far, I’ve bought a Topshop jumpsuit that I previously borrowed off a friend, a blue suede Topshop skirt that I’d bought in a charity shop but was much too small, a pair of colour block jeans and a really cool Whitney Houston t-shirt.

I was after this blue suede Topshop skirt for years!

I rarely ever buy new clothing nowadays but I still love looking at what’s available in high-street shops.

So, if you’re looking to make your wardrobe more sustainable but aren’t a fan of vintage/charity shops, Depop is a great place to start and save money while you’re at it. Or you can declutter your own wardrobe and make some money while you’re at it.

The best part of Depop is that your cash isn’t going to line the pockets of a big coporation, Depop sellers are primarily young women or independent retailers.

I finally found the skirt!

Buying tips

Don’t restrict your search to just your own country

It’s tempting to limit your search to your own country as most sellers will ask you to pay postage.

But if you are really keen to find an item, tick the worldwide box and see what you can find. I’ve actually bought more items from UK/Northern Ireland sellers than Irish sellers.

Wearing the jumpsuit four years ago

I bought both the jumpsuit and the suede skirt from UK sellers and they arrived quite quickly.

Take your measurements

Most Depop sellers don’t offer refunds so you’ll need to ascertain the fit before you buy. Ask for measurements, take your own measurements (leg length ankle to crotch, widest part of bust and hips and narrowest part of waist).

Rather than relying on the size provided by the seller, I’ve been taking my own measurements for a more accurate fit.

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I bought these jeans – but they did not fit!

I recently bought a size 10 pair of jeans on Depop only to find that they didn’t fit at all. So, when I was buying the suede skirt, I asked the seller to take measurements and checked them against my own and happily it fit.

Ask questions

If you’re thinking of buying something, ask questions first.

I.e. What’s the fit like, do you have more photos, was this taken with a flash (can make colours look different), any faults etc.

Most sellers are very obliging and won’t mind providing you with more information. Be sure to ask about postage, returns policy and delivery time.

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Whitney t-shirt

Check prices between different sellers

If you find several people selling the item you’re after, check what the best price available is and ask each individual seller about postage costs as they may vary,

That way you can be sure you’re getting a good price. It’s also worth assessing the condition of each item however, some may be cheaper due to flaws/condition.

Haggle if possible

Now I’ve never been the best haggler in the world but this is a platform where you can make offers and bargain.

Some sellers will state that they welcome offers and others will not. You can also offer a swap of an item or ask if they can do a bundle deal or free postage. It’s always worth asking but obviously don’t take the piss either or you probably will end up on the Depop drama Insta!

If an item doesn’t work out

If your item is not as described or has undeclared faults, you can ask the seller for a refund. If they won’t help, you can open a dispute with Paypal.

Every transaction made through Paypal ensures your purchase or sale is protected if anything goes wrong.

Make sure to purchase through the Depop buy button rather than a private arrangement as you have more protection this way. Where possible, ask for a tracking number also.

If something just doesn’t fit and you can’t return it, you can always try selling it yourself or donate it.

Upload a pic of what you’re looking for

If you can’t find what you’re looking for, upload a pic and caption it “not for sale”.

State the brand and size and a description of the item you’re after, you never know someone may have it in the back of their wardrobe!

SELLING

Take the best photos you can

Ideally your photos should be of someone wearing the outfit but if that’s not possible, good lighting and clutter-free backgrounds are a must.

Make sure you show the front and rear of the item and take pictures of any flaws. If the colour is not showing up right in the pic, make sure you mention in the listing what the true colour is.

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My Depop profile (my pics leave a lot be desired but I’m working on it)

Be flexible with your pricing

The quality of the item should be reflected in the price so if it’s an item you’ve worn a lot, don’t charge what you paid for it. New items with tags still on can command more as can lightly worn items or secondhand designer items. If you don’t accept offers/swaps, it’s a good idea to mention that.

Use tags

Depop will only allow five hashtags per item, however, you can include more popular keywords that people commonly search for (y2k comes to mind!)

Be truthful

“Such a stunning Y2K top, one of a kind”, grates after you read it for the 50th time. Likewise, don’t list an old Jane Norman cardi as “vintage”, that will only irritate buyers. True vintage clothing should be at least 20/30 years old so don’t lose the run of yourself.

Give as much detail as possible and be patient if your buyer has questions.

Ask for reviews and leave reviews

It’s nice to be nice and getting a good review will increase trust and encourage more people to buy from you. So ask your buyers to leave a review when they’re satisfied and also review them as buyers. It’s a win-win!

Approach potential buyers

If someone likes an item, don’t be shy, drop them a DM and ask if they’re interested in buying. I get these messages all the time and usually I just reply browsing thanks but a friendly message could help close a sale,

When your items aren’t selling

If your items haven’t sold, there are a number of avenues you can explore. You can delete the listing and reupload it with new pics or update the description. You can lower the price or offer a limited discount or offer bundle prices.

You can also share your items on other social media such as Instagram or Facebook, it may catch someone’s eye there.

Above all, don’t be disheartened, it takes time and patience to build a up a Depop profile.

I’m really enjoying using Depop and I’ve found it to be one of my favourite ways to shop now, particularly when shops aren’t open.

Have you used Depop? Leave me a comment below by clicking on the grey speech bubble icon and let me know.

Thanks for reading as always and I hope you found the tips helpful! Don’t forget to check out my InstagramTwitter and Facebook page and of course my Depop @edelh22.

Edel

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How to machine dye old jeans with Dylon

With the shops closed and the majority of us spending most of our time at home, now is a good time to go through your wardrobe.

Perhaps you need to do a purge of things that don’t fit or no longer suit your lifestyle.

Put what you don’t want into a bag for the charity shops as they’ll be in need of donations when they re-open.

Alternatively, you can take your old clothes to a clothes bank if there’s one in your local area or cut up old/stained clothing to make into dusters.

If you have an item you like but you want to breathe new life into it, why not try an upcycle? Fabric paint, dye, embroidery, zips, and studs can all inject new life into an old item.

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I’m going to share one of my favourite upcycling methods and show how machine dye transformed these vintage jeans.

When I first bought these jeans, I really liked the fit of them but I wasn’t crazy about the colour. (I took before pics but for the life of me, I can’t find them!)

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Bored in the house and I’m in the house bored

I was at a Tola Vintage kilo sale when I spotted these Levis 511 jeans. They are a slim fit but not skinny and low rise.

What I liked most about them was how thick and hardwearing the denim is. PS, I spilled water on them in the pic above, hence the weird discolouration!

I wore them a few times but I found it hard to match the weird grey/white colour and so they soon were left in a drawer.

Browsing in Hickeys one day, I saw some navy Dylon dye and I decided it was time to dye the jeans.

The process was really simple. I’d hand-dyed things before which can get messy but this was machine dye so I just had to pop the jeans into the wash with the dye capsule and run a cycle on 30C or 40C.

Then I had to wash them again with detergent on the same cycle and wait for them to dry.

The jeans emerged a gorgeous dark navy with the stitching remaining white. I hadn’t planned this but I really liked the effect.

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Levis 511 dyed jeans

However, the brown Levis patch on the back did dye which I was hoping it wouldn’t.

I don’t know if there’s a way around this but if there is, let me know!

Since I dyed the jeans, I’ve worn them much more frequently and found it easier to match them with outfits. The colour has also remained strong with numerous washes almost two years on.

This dye will remain on anything it stains, some got onto a towel I was using and it is still there to this day! So wear rubber gloves and old clothes and follow instructions carefully!

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Levis tab

The colour of the dye on the box didn’t look that dark but it came out a deep navy blue which was exactly what I wanted. As far as I can remember the shade I picked was called navy blue.

Dylon also have a dye especially for faded jeans which I may use to revive old pairs in the future.

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Levis 511 jeans

It’s important to remember that every fabric is different and dye results will depend on the permeability of the fabric and type of fabric. And some fabrics can’t be dyed, so check before you break open the dye.

The weight of the fabric and the amount of synthetic fibres will affect the final result, synthetic mixes will come out lighter.

From a sustainability point of view, obviously the dye residue will go into the water and there’s a good bit of washing involved but it’s probably still more sustainable than going out and buying a brand new item.

Machine-dying a few items with one capsule is probably the most sustainable way of doing it.

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Stitching on the back pocket

If you want to avoid artificial dyes, you can experiment with natural dyes, such as fruits and vegetables. Check out Moya (Environmental Eadai) on Instagram or Aisling Duffy Designs for natural dye inspiration.

Hope you all enjoyed this upcycling post and let me know if you decide to try machine dyes.

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My dyed Levis 511s

As for what else I’m wearing in the outfit above, it’s all vintage or thrifted except for my sunglasses. My boots were about €22 from a charity shop, shirt was about €6 from a charity shop (both River Island).

The jeans and my leather waiscoat were sold by kilo so I can’t remember what I paid but whole outfit is probably only about €55.

Thanks for reading and be sure to check out the competition I’m running on my Instagram and Facebook pages at the moment.

Edel

 

Phibsborough Charity Shop Haul and Thrifting Tips

More and more people are searching for sustainable and slow fashion options these days and I’m happy to say I’m also trying to do my bit.

I’ve always loved mooching in the charity shops for a browse and when I was on a very low income, thrifting allowed me to express my love for fashion without breaking the bank!

Don’t get me wrong I still love Penneys like Kanye loves Kanye but I am making a conscious effort to buy secondhand where possible.

I thrift all over Dublin and beyond but below is a haul of some of the many bargains I bought in various charity shops in Phibsborough.

For people who are reluctant to buy in charity shops or would like to donate here’s what you need to know.

Charity shops won’t sell rags or dirty, torn clothing, so don’t donate these! You can bring them to a recycling bank instead, there are loads of them, even in the country so there’s no excuse not to. I always recycle my old clothes as I hate waste.

Some clothing may be brand new with tags on, others will have slight to moderate wear and tear. The prices will reflect this. Don’t try and barter in charity shops.

Do ask when the window display is on sale if you like an item in the window. Generally, the best items, branded handbags, etc. end up here.

But I’ve gotten a designer bag ( DKNY) and a very good fake Longchamps in a charity shop which weren’t in the window so keep your eyes peeled!

Charity shops do have sales- Enable Ireland is especially good and I picked up some absolute beauts in their Phibsborough shop.

I found this brand new Missguided bardot playsuit which is €30.80 on their site for just €4!

The bardot style is still on-trend and it’s perfect for a night out. It’s a size 10 but small fitting.

reverse playsuit edit

stripe playsuit edit

work party 2

I’ve worn this playsuit with heels on nights out and as a more casual summer look with espadrilles during the day.

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Striped playsuit

I also saw a cute pleather lilac skirt in an 8 from River Island that I had to try on. It was €3.90 with some signs of wear.

It fit perfectly and would be ideal with a black or white top for a night out.

This has some slight discolouration but not very noticeable.

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lilac skirt 2 edited

Then I tried on these pyjama style pants, size 10 from Dunnes. I have never worn this kind of trousers but I’m tired of jeans not fitting me, as my weight fluctuates a lot.

These are a great alternative to jeans,  soft and comfy and I adore florals.

They are a little worn and the previous owner cut a small slit into the waistband which I didn’t notice till I got home.

These are loose but have a belt and were €3.90. (P.S. I’ve even worn them to work!)

floral trousers edit

floral pyjama trouser edit

My entire haul of those three items came to €11.80 so I was delighted. As you can see it’s necessary to try on charity shop clothing as you won’t be able to guess sizes and few offer a refund.

There are six charity shops in Phibsborough, Enable Ireland, Oxfam, Debra Ireland, Irish Cancer Society and tucked away up across from St Peter’s Church is a small but very good CASA shop.

Just across from the shopping centre, is a small Aware shop.

I’ve found some gems here such as this 90s style denim dress which was about €6.

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Vintage denim dress from Aware

The bag I’m wearing with it was bought in the Irish Cancer Society shop.

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Denim dress and vintage bag

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Denim dress and vintage bag

My favourite charity shop is probably Enable Ireland.

They always have really nice good quality stock and they even offer an exchange with a receipt which is rare for a charity shop.

I bought this denim jacket there about 6 years ago and it’s still in good nick.

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Denim jacket

They also always have some really nice novelty homeware bits to spruce up your gaff.

I’ve also got loads of lovely things in Oxfam, especially before their renovation this year.

They had an amazing sale where I got a Zara wrap dress and a cute floral playsuit for €1 each!

Obviously, that was a clearance sale but they do have lots of great bargains and the shop looks lovely since it was refurbished.

They also now have a small vintage section which is well worth checking out.

And one of my favourite charity shop bargains ever was this colourful silky bomber which was about €6 from Oxfam Phibsborough.

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I still have this gorgeous jacket I found in a charity shop

And I fell in love with this pretty willow-print dress during the heatwave last year when I desperately needed clothes that were light but still work-appropriate.

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Blue and white willow print dress from Oxfam

Debra Ireland is the newest charity shop in the neighbourhood, it’s open about a year.

Among the lovely things I’ve bought from here is this real suede blue Mango jacket for about €10 and a quirky little 00s style Oriental bag for about €6.

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Blue suede Mango jacket

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Oriental clutch bag

And the Irish Cancer Society shop can also be a good shout for homeware, I found these gorgeous prints for my apartment.

Hope you enjoyed this haul and if you’re in Phibsborough, be sure to check out the charity shops, you won’t regret it!

Leave me a comment below and let me know what you thought. Don’t forget to check out my Instagram and Facebook page here.

Thanks for reading as always.

Edel