alt=

Depop drama: Buying, selling and everything you need to know

I first used Depop about four years ago when I was in college and desperate to make a quick buck. I listed a few things for sale but as my phone camera was pretty terrible, my pics weren’t very enticing and I never made a sale.

I soom deleted the app and didn’t feel very encouraged to use it again.

Fast forward to 2020, Depop is even bigger than ever. During lockdown I began obsessing about tracking down a pair of shoes after I lost one while moving house. I’m wearing them in the pic below.

After searching the shoe online, several Depop links came up. I downloaded the app again and began trawling.

I messaged several people to no avail but finally I found a girl selling them in a size 5 and bought them from her. Unfortunately, they didn’t fit.

The shoes soon went to the charity shop but my curiousity was piqued and I realised Depop was the perfect way to hunt items that I’d previously seen in shops/online or no longer fitted me.

I tracked down the shoes but sadly they were too small.

This behaviour may seem bizarre to people with real hobbies but for me, it’s proved very satisfying.

A friend of mine even found shoes for her wedding on there. She was finding it hard to shop because of lockdown, I asked her what style and size she was after and within a few minutes, I’d pulled up some options on Depop!

So far, I’ve bought a Topshop jumpsuit that I previously borrowed off a friend, a blue suede Topshop skirt that I’d bought in a charity shop but was much too small, a pair of colour block jeans and a really cool Whitney Houston t-shirt.

I was after this blue suede Topshop skirt for years!

I rarely ever buy new clothing nowadays but I still love looking at what’s available in high-street shops.

So, if you’re looking to make your wardrobe more sustainable but aren’t a fan of vintage/charity shops, Depop is a great place to start and save money while you’re at it. Or you can declutter your own wardrobe and make some money while you’re at it.

The best part of Depop is that your cash isn’t going to line the pockets of a big coporation, Depop sellers are primarily young women or independent retailers.

I finally found the skirt!

Buying tips

Don’t restrict your search to just your own country

It’s tempting to limit your search to your own country as most sellers will ask you to pay postage.

But if you are really keen to find an item, tick the worldwide box and see what you can find. I’ve actually bought more items from UK/Northern Ireland sellers than Irish sellers.

Wearing the jumpsuit four years ago

I bought both the jumpsuit and the suede skirt from UK sellers and they arrived quite quickly.

Take your measurements

Most Depop sellers don’t offer refunds so you’ll need to ascertain the fit before you buy. Ask for measurements, take your own measurements (leg length ankle to crotch, widest part of bust and hips and narrowest part of waist).

Rather than relying on the size provided by the seller, I’ve been taking my own measurements for a more accurate fit.

alt=
I bought these jeans – but they did not fit!

I recently bought a size 10 pair of jeans on Depop only to find that they didn’t fit at all. So, when I was buying the suede skirt, I asked the seller to take measurements and checked them against my own and happily it fit.

Ask questions

If you’re thinking of buying something, ask questions first.

I.e. What’s the fit like, do you have more photos, was this taken with a flash (can make colours look different), any faults etc.

Most sellers are very obliging and won’t mind providing you with more information. Be sure to ask about postage, returns policy and delivery time.

alt=
Whitney t-shirt

Check prices between different sellers

If you find several people selling the item you’re after, check what the best price available is and ask each individual seller about postage costs as they may vary,

That way you can be sure you’re getting a good price. It’s also worth assessing the condition of each item however, some may be cheaper due to flaws/condition.

Haggle if possible

Now I’ve never been the best haggler in the world but this is a platform where you can make offers and bargain.

Some sellers will state that they welcome offers and others will not. You can also offer a swap of an item or ask if they can do a bundle deal or free postage. It’s always worth asking but obviously don’t take the piss either or you probably will end up on the Depop drama Insta!

If an item doesn’t work out

If your item is not as described or has undeclared faults, you can ask the seller for a refund. If they won’t help, you can open a dispute with Paypal.

Every transaction made through Paypal ensures your purchase or sale is protected if anything goes wrong.

Make sure to purchase through the Depop buy button rather than a private arrangement as you have more protection this way. Where possible, ask for a tracking number also.

If something just doesn’t fit and you can’t return it, you can always try selling it yourself or donate it.

Upload a pic of what you’re looking for

If you can’t find what you’re looking for, upload a pic and caption it “not for sale”.

State the brand and size and a description of the item you’re after, you never know someone may have it in the back of their wardrobe!

SELLING

Take the best photos you can

Ideally your photos should be of someone wearing the outfit but if that’s not possible, good lighting and clutter-free backgrounds are a must.

Make sure you show the front and rear of the item and take pictures of any flaws. If the colour is not showing up right in the pic, make sure you mention in the listing what the true colour is.

alt=
My Depop profile (my pics leave a lot be desired but I’m working on it)

Be flexible with your pricing

The quality of the item should be reflected in the price so if it’s an item you’ve worn a lot, don’t charge what you paid for it. New items with tags still on can command more as can lightly worn items or secondhand designer items. If you don’t accept offers/swaps, it’s a good idea to mention that.

Use tags

Depop will only allow five hashtags per item, however, you can include more popular keywords that people commonly search for (y2k comes to mind!)

Be truthful

“Such a stunning Y2K top, one of a kind”, grates after you read it for the 50th time. Likewise, don’t list an old Jane Norman cardi as “vintage”, that will only irritate buyers. True vintage clothing should be at least 20/30 years old so don’t lose the run of yourself.

Give as much detail as possible and be patient if your buyer has questions.

Ask for reviews and leave reviews

It’s nice to be nice and getting a good review will increase trust and encourage more people to buy from you. So ask your buyers to leave a review when they’re satisfied and also review them as buyers. It’s a win-win!

Approach potential buyers

If someone likes an item, don’t be shy, drop them a DM and ask if they’re interested in buying. I get these messages all the time and usually I just reply browsing thanks but a friendly message could help close a sale,

When your items aren’t selling

If your items haven’t sold, there are a number of avenues you can explore. You can delete the listing and reupload it with new pics or update the description. You can lower the price or offer a limited discount or offer bundle prices.

You can also share your items on other social media such as Instagram or Facebook, it may catch someone’s eye there.

Above all, don’t be disheartened, it takes time and patience to build a up a Depop profile.

I’m really enjoying using Depop and I’ve found it to be one of my favourite ways to shop now, particularly when shops aren’t open.

Have you used Depop? Leave me a comment below by clicking on the grey speech bubble icon and let me know.

Thanks for reading as always and I hope you found the tips helpful! Don’t forget to check out my InstagramTwitter and Facebook page and of course my Depop @edelh22.

Edel

No New Clothes for a month

NO BUYING  CLOTHES FOR A WHOLE MONTH?!!

I stumbled across a blogging challenge online hosted by Looking Fly on a Dime, an NYC- based blogger who is not buying new clothing for an entire year and will only shop at charity shops.

I was immediately inspired to do the same especially as I’d just read Overdressed:The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion which exposes the manufacture and production of cheap high-street clothing in scathing detail.

Although we all know the manufacture of cheap clothing has a negative impact on both human life and the environment, it’s easy to ignore this when faced with a bargain.

I don’t intend to sound self-righteous as I buy mostly cheap clothing and love fashion but the book did make me think about my clothing consumption and consumer habits. I already love charity shops and literally cannot walk by one so I thought why not try the challenge?

However, no new clothing for a year seems like a crazy notion to me so I thought I’d try it for one month. The challenge has been accomplished successfully twice by Patrice from Looking Fly on a Dime but she lives in New York where there are more charity shops and indeed more shops in general 😛

She encourages her readers to try the challenge as well but not to set themselves unrealistic goals, i.e. try it for a month or two.

Now I have a hideous lack of self-control, motivation, and willpower so we’ll see how I get on!

Thankfully I am not required to buy new clothing for work so that is one obstacle overcome. If nothing else it may teach me how to have more control! I once ambitiously tried not to buy any clothing for all of Lent (I now do not observe Lent as I don’t believe in sacrifice or organised religion..) I think I lasted about two weeks.

The only exceptions to the challenge are underwear and hosiery which for obvious reasons are best bought new. Patrice also set herself a spending limit of $50 for each month but as I’m doing it for one month I’m not going to do this.

I know already today I have to return a pair of shoes that are too large for me so I hope I don’t get sucked in by the sales!

It’s going to be really difficult when I see all the lovely sale bargains everywhere but hopefully, I can do it. January is a terrible time to do this but it will be fun to try it. It’s a great incentive to save money as I really need to put money away for the future.

Obviously, I’m motivated by economic and selfish reasons rather than ethical reasons but no harm in being accidentally ethical.

I’ll be visiting my local Dublin charity shops including The Macro charity shop which provides assistance to community and voluntary agencies in the local area just off North King Street and as well as the great charity shops all down Capel Street.

My favourite local charity shop has to be Respect in Stoneybatter where I’ve found genuine DKNY and a decent fake Longchamp bag in the past.

I know anyone wishing to do this who doesn’t live in a city or near a big town may find it more difficult as there are fewer charity shops but where there’s a will there’s a way and at least you won’t be near temptation either!

I hope it will be fun rather than painful and I’m aware you can make unnecessary and impulse purchases in charity shops too so I’ll bear that in mind. I’ve gotten some great bargains in charity shops and lots of my thrifted style photos are on my Instagram.

I intend to put my substantial wardrobe to good use also during the challenge. The premise of my blog has always been about affordable fashion and being creative, not mindless consumerism.

Let me know what you think and if you’re doing this challenge or a similar one. WISH ME LUCK! I’m going to need it!

Thanks for reading as always and don’t forget to check out my InstagramTwitter and Facebook page here.

Edel

Goodwill! Poppin’ tags!

When I was a kid, my mother bought many of my clothes in second hand shops (the joys of being an only girl and the youngest!) I used to get in a huff about this sometimes but once I moved to college and starting getting bargains from the bigger charity stores I soon changed my tune!

Thrift-Shop-Sign

I’m a bookworm but rarely buy them new, as you can get all types of books second hand for a few euros which is a lovely treat for a rainy day. I don’t normally buy shoes there but I’ve often given them some of mine when I had to give up a few pairs for reasons of space and sanity! 😉

I’ve gotten amazing bargains such as a striped Topshop blazer for €4, my winter coat for this year for  €9.50 (saving me approximately €50), a pair of River Island jeans and Converse trackies for €5 each and even a mini sewing machine for €9.90.

I’ve also picked up little things for my room and jewellery at times and of course donated lots of things to the charity shops when I was moving around or clearing out.

I saw a huge Salvation Army store during my time in the US but unfortunately never got to go and see what was there. So in the future I would really love to check out charity shops abroad and see what they are like.

Thrift shoppin’ is fun and I don’t even always do it out of necessity! If you are lucky you might get a designer bargain or find an item that you lusted after before but was sold out by the time you had money for it.

The shops I visit around here vary from actual charity shops to businesses and vintage stores.The vintage stores are mostly to admire things rather than buy. I always seem to find things in Enable Ireland and Phibsborough has the best charity shops.

If you’re in Galway the St Vincent de Paul shop near the docks is really big for a charity shop and very well organised.

House of Portobello is not a charity shop but an amazing place to find a designer bargain. They sell good as new high street and designer clothing. The stock is always fantastic shoes, bags, dresses, jewellery and even unused marked down beauty products. I bought a beautiful pair of River Island red peep toes here for  €50. They were perfect quality and would retail at €70-€80.

My gorgeous shoes!

Here I’m wearing them with a €4 Missguided playsuit which was brand new from Enable Ireland.

 

The downside of charity shops is of course there’s usually only one of an item, good things are snapped up fast and you may see something you love, seize it and then..it’s not in your size! 😥

Naturally it’s also tempting to buy things merely because they’re cheap. However it’s one of the best and more fun ways to spend. Excuse all the subtle Macklemore references, apparently he has Irish roots….my Irish mammy would be delighted with his thriftiness! 😉

tumblr_mietsgrie61rj0rn6o1_500

Do you have any favourite charity shops? Let me know! Thanks for checking out my blog. 🙂 Thanks for reading as always and don’t forget to check out my InstagramTwitter and Facebook page here.